News & Events

AES Marine informs safety, health and environmental professionals in the production, manufacturing, construction and service sectors about trends, management strategies, loss prevention, regulatory news and new products that help them provide a safe and healthy workplace.

“Get Out of The Way!” 
September 23, 2019

Have you ever had to tell someone “get out of the way,” or “watch out,” or “please stand somewhere else?” When you have multiple activities, you have multiple opportunities for an accident. In most cases, work-related injuries and property damage incidents occur during simultaneous operations (SIMOPS), which is usually the result of workers being somewhere they shouldn’t be.

 

An effective control to eliminate non-essential workers from entering a hazardous Work Zone (also known as the exclusion area) is to use barriers (such as hazard cones and/or caution tape). Any person who is not authorized to be in a work zone should be positioned in the Safe Zone (an area FREE of interaction with people working, active equipment/machinery). Non-essential personnel only create a distraction, make work areas much smaller, and can created a crowded evacuation area.

get out the way

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.

 

New API Certification for Engine Oil Marketers 
July 22, 2019

new api certification for engine oil marketers

The American Petroleum Institute (API) establishes new engine oil performance standards.  Last week, the API issued an updated standard outlining their certification requirements that govern how engine oil marketers certify that gasoline and diesel engine oils meet API’s engine oil performance standards.

 

The 18th edition of API 1509, Engine Oil Licensing and Certification System, outlines the voluntary API Engine Oil Licensing and Certification System (EOLCS) as well as the methods for developing new engine oil performance standards.  This new standard outlines to sellers the API Marks and their use, licensing requirements and aftermarket conformance and enforcement procedures that help to ensure that products licensed as or claiming to meet API standards actually do meet the standards.

The 18th version of API 1509, “will help to ensure consumers have the peace of mind that they’re putting the highest-quality engine oils in their cars or trucks,” said Kevin Ferrick, director, API Product Programs.

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

Second Dump Cite Incident in Four Weeks 
June 24, 2019

Second workplace accident at a Sydney dump in the past four weeks. This morning’s incident resulted in a 52-year-old worker sustaining chest and head injuries. The worker was delivering a load in his truck at a waste facility in Camelia, near Parramatta, early this morning. Early reports indicate the worker may have failed to put the brakes on his vehicle, which then began to roll away. Subsequently, the worker chased the vehicle and became crushed between the cabin door and the trash bin, which knocked him unconscious.

The severity of damage required Emergency Response personnel to cut away the door, allowing paramedics and Care Flight doctors to treat the injured man. The worker was rushed to Westmead Hospital in critical condition. The worker’s employer, Just Skip Bins, are co-operating with police and SafeWork in their investigation.

 

second dump cite incident in four weeks

Last month, two men had become trapped under tons of waste at the Eastern Creek facility. Both men were recovered, however only one man survived. The incident is still under investigation. However, this incident trend at Sydney dump facilities has now become a growing concern.

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.

 

Why Memorialize the Dead? 
June 17, 2019

why memorialize the dead

Arguments on both sides was generated last week, when the Chemical Safety Board (CSB) released their 158-page report on the fatal gas well blowout that occurred at the Pryor Trust well in Oklahoma in January 2018. The CSB investigates chemical industrial accidents to identify roots causes and help make sure that they do not reoccur. In previous findings reports involving fatalities, CSB included a dedication page at the very beginning listing the names of the everyone who had died.

This has sparked arguments from both safety and worker advocate associations. “The lack of names was not an oversight, but a deliberate decision,” explained Hillary Cohen, a CSB spokeswoman. Cohen remarked the agency’s belief to “honor, respect and remember” the dead. However, “Placing the names of individuals that were fatally injured as a result of the incident and dedicating the report to them may infer culpability on the part of the entity responsible for the operation of the facility where the incident occurred.”

Advocates are outraged at the dead merely be referred to as “workers” in the report. Celeste Monforton, lecturer on occupational health and safety at George Washington University and investigator involved in the Upper Big Branch disaster which killed 29 coal miners, said, “it means a lot to family members to see the deceased recognized as human beings, rather than just job classifications. The act also helps convey the significance of the underlying investigation; there are lives at stake.”

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

Missing Supervisor Found Dead 
June 10, 2019

Seven days ago, Monday the 3rd of June, workers continued throughout the afternoon and evening to locate their supervisor. Late in the evening, Trina Cunningham, Baltimore Department of Public Works (DPW) supervisor was found dead in a vat of water at the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant.

The City Union of Baltimore, which represents about 5,000 municipal and city school system employees released a statement which included, “this incident calls into question workplace safety protocols for the women and men who make sure our public works are safe for us.”

Cunningham, employed by the City of Baltimore for more than 20 years, was characterized as “a very dedicated, committed employee,” by the Rudy Chow, DPW Director. When engaged with reporters for additional information regarding alleged fire officials reporting a grate was missing from a catwalk that Cunningham was using, Chow told reporters, “the case is still under investigation… we don’t have all the pieces yet.”

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.

missing supervisor dead

40 Dead and 400 Injured 
May 6, 2019

40 dead 400 injured

More than 40 workers have died, and at least 400 continue to suffer ill effects associated with cleaning up the nation’s largest coal ash spill. The spill devastated the community, destroying a half dozen homes, roadways, and infrastructure and remains the largest human-created environmental disaster in U.S. history – larger than the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska and 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

A decade after the spill, workers say they were sickened, and many of their colleagues have died from exposure to the toxic elements found in coal ash from the December 2008 spill at the Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in Roane County. The dike of a coal ash storage facility at the TVA Kingston Fossil Plant in Roane County gave way in December 2008, spilling an estimated 7.3 million tons of the byproduct of burning coal onto 300 acres of land.

Coal is mostly carbon with variable amounts of other elements; chiefly hydrogen, sulfur, oxygen and nitrogen. Coal is formed if dead plant matter decays into peat and over millions of years the heat and pressure of deep burial converts the peat into coal. The same chemistry that enables coal to produce energy—the breaking down of carbon molecules—also produces a number of profoundly harmful environmental impacts and pollutants that harm public health. Air pollution and global warming are two of the most serious.

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.

Poultry Workers Demand Safer Conditions
April 29, 2019

Our fathers and grandfathers, industrial workers, those who built America, were bullied and beaten whenever they tried to ask for better working conditions. Today is not different, workers intimated to speak up for the fear of losing of their job. Single income families, single parents, people just trying to make a living, paycheck to paycheck. These and many more tend to fear speaking out, so what can they do?

 

This fear is easier to handle when you have fellow workers standing next to you. Last week, Minnesota poultry workers and advocated rallied for safer working condition as well as to commemorate Workers Memorial Day, which remembers workers who have died on the job or who were injured at work. The workers, former workers, and advocates gathered in front of the Stearns Country Courthouse last Thursday to addressed alleged issues at the Pilgrim’s Pride poultry processing plant in Cold Spring, Minnesota.

Nearly 27% of the workers surveyed said they have sustained injuries at work, and some workers said they don’t report injuries out of concern of job loss or that management may not take them seriously. The survey said workers felt managers instilled substantial fear and intimidation, causing them to not report injuries for fear of job loss. To date, only three investigations (2010, 2013, and 2015) have been conducted by OHSA, and workers say conditions have not improved.

poultry workers demand safer conditions

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

Worker Falls 40 Feet
April 22, 2019

Idaho construction worker was killed in a fall this past week.  Melvin E. Balaban, of Crete, a 56-year-old construction worker fell from a Costco chicken processing plant.  He suffered fatal injuries after falling 40-feet and was pronounced dead at the scene.

Thursday morning, Emergency Services responded too find Mr. Balaban fatally injured, and another worker, was trapped 30-feet above the ground and had to be freed by rescue workers.  Caleb M. Sabatka, 26-year-old Beatrice man, was rescued and taken by helicopter to CHI Creighton University Bergan Mercy in Omaha.

Worker Falls 40 Feet

A Lincoln Premium Poultry Representative, a project partner, stated both workers were employees of contractors working at the site.  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is investigating the incident.  For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.

Federal Safety Authority Decreases, Work Fatalities Increases
April 15, 2019

The National Employment Law Project (NELP) released a study revealing that workplaces monitored by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), has identified that workplace deaths have increased at the same time as the number of federal inspectors have decreased. OSHA, the federal agency responsible for preventing workers from getting killed, poisoned, abused or dismembered at work appears to have seen some significant decreases in man-power.

The two-year study attributes the drop largely to attrition and stagnation, not funding cuts. OSHA’s budget has stayed relatively level year to year. However, OSHA has not replaced any of the staff who have left, not hiring a single new inspector if all of fiscal year 2017. It is unclear whether the slowdown reflects a deliberate attempt to minimize OSHA’s ability to function. As of fiscal year 2017, there were only 1,821 workplace inspectors in both federal and state agencies combined, covering almost 9 million workplaces nationwide

federal safety authority decreases

For further information about this or other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

Shipyard Safety Concerns 
April 8, 2019

shipyard safety concerns

Several work groups and labor activists are working to break a trend of workplace accidents at the district’s ship breaking yards, as they question occupational safety measures. In the past 3 years, the Department of Inspection for Factories and Establishments (DIFE) have recorded 43 worker fatalities at ship-breaking yards. A Non-Government Organization (NGO), Young Power in Social Action, defending worker rights and protecting the environment, released records stating that more than 200 workers have died in the last 15 years.

Many of the workplace accidents resulting in these fatalities include:
• Cylinder, boiler, and generator explosions,
• Coming in contact with toxic material from ships,
• Workers inhaling dangerous substances like carbon monoxide,
• Workers falling from heights with no safety harness,
• Workers getting crushed by fall steel beams and heavy plates, and
• Electrical shocks.

A recent publication by the International Labor Organization (ILO) reveals that ship-breaking has become a major occupational and environmental health concern. It has become one of the more dangerous of occupations, with high levels of fatalities, injuries and work-related diseases.

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.