News & Events

AES Marine informs safety, health and environmental professionals in the production, manufacturing, construction and service sectors about trends, management strategies, loss prevention, regulatory news and new products that help them provide a safe and healthy workplace.

Federal Safety Authority Decreases, Work Fatalities Increases
April 15, 2019

The National Employment Law Project (NELP) released a study revealing that workplaces monitored by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), has identified that workplace deaths have increased at the same time as the number of federal inspectors have decreased. OSHA, the federal agency responsible for preventing workers from getting killed, poisoned, abused or dismembered at work appears to have seen some significant decreases in man-power.

The two-year study attributes the drop largely to attrition and stagnation, not funding cuts. OSHA’s budget has stayed relatively level year to year. However, OSHA has not replaced any of the staff who have left, not hiring a single new inspector if all of fiscal year 2017. It is unclear whether the slowdown reflects a deliberate attempt to minimize OSHA’s ability to function. As of fiscal year 2017, there were only 1,821 workplace inspectors in both federal and state agencies combined, covering almost 9 million workplaces nationwide

federal safety authority decreases

For further information about this or other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

Shipyard Safety Concerns 
April 8, 2019

shipyard safety concerns

Several work groups and labor activists are working to break a trend of workplace accidents at the district’s ship breaking yards, as they question occupational safety measures. In the past 3 years, the Department of Inspection for Factories and Establishments (DIFE) have recorded 43 worker fatalities at ship-breaking yards. A Non-Government Organization (NGO), Young Power in Social Action, defending worker rights and protecting the environment, released records stating that more than 200 workers have died in the last 15 years.

Many of the workplace accidents resulting in these fatalities include:
• Cylinder, boiler, and generator explosions,
• Coming in contact with toxic material from ships,
• Workers inhaling dangerous substances like carbon monoxide,
• Workers falling from heights with no safety harness,
• Workers getting crushed by fall steel beams and heavy plates, and
• Electrical shocks.

A recent publication by the International Labor Organization (ILO) reveals that ship-breaking has become a major occupational and environmental health concern. It has become one of the more dangerous of occupations, with high levels of fatalities, injuries and work-related diseases.

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.

 

New Agency Managing Workplace, School & Public Safety 
March 4, 2019

In the last 32 months, 85 Florida citizens have lost their lives due to workplace and school violence. A new group’s primary focus will be investigating and developing best practices for businesses and schools in the state. However, a significant area of concern being avoided by the group, includes gun control.

The Institute for a Safer Florida, which is being spearheaded by the Florida Chamber of Commerce, has been developed following polling conducted buy a coalition of law enforcement, businesses, mental health professionals, and educators. “We’ve got to get past reacting to a shooting and try to prevent them,” said Executive Director of Florida State University Schools, Dr. Stacy Chambers.

Gun control apparently is not going to be a primary focus of the Institute. “That’s someone else’s argument and we are not going to get into that argument,” stated Mark Wilson, President of the Florida Chamber of Commerce. “We’re going to get into best practices, we’re going to get into mental health. That’s the conversation we think we can make a difference on.”

new agency managing workplace school and public and safety

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices, (210) 430-3469.

 

Concrete Block Claims Worker’s Life 
February 25, 2019

concrete block claims workers life

A worker is pronounced dead, following a workplace injury at a local cement plant. Emergency crews were called to the Inland Concrete plant in Calgary’s northwest end on Tuesday afternoon. The worker was taken by ambulance for treatment but died of his injuries before reaching the hospital.

The governmental agency, Occupational Health and Safety, has launched an investigation into the fatality. Authorities have not released the worker’s name.

Lehigh Hanson Canada, the parent company of Inland Concrete, released a statement that the worker had been struck by a concrete block. Both Inland and Lehigh Hanson released a joint statement, “…we are committed to workplace safety.” “We appreciate the efforts of the emergency services responders and everyone helping at the accident scene,” the company said. “Our thoughts are with our employee’s family and friends during this difficult time.”

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

Employees State Workplace Fatality Preventable 
February 18, 2019

Following a crushing injury this past Friday, the 15th of February, a production line worker with 24 years of experience with the company was pronounced dead Sunday.  The worker was pinned in a machine, suffering critical injuries to his abdomen, at the GE Appliance Park refrigeration production line in Louisville, Kentucky.

 

A local news channel released an investigative news story with co-workers reporting, ‘…there was numerous complaints about ‘faulty safety features.’  “There is a gate that when it opens, it’s supposed to stop the line as a safety precaution and it did not work.”  “The company loves to tell us that safety is their No.1 issue but it’s not.  They put it on the back burner,” the co-worker stated.

 

employees state workplace fatality preventable

A spokesperson for GE released the following statement, “There is an ongoing investigation of the incident. We have a robust safety process and are already working with OSHA. We are committed to ensure the safety and well-being of our employees.” Louisville Metro Police Department are also investigating the “workplace accident.”

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

 

117 Lives Taken by The Sea 
February 11, 2019

117 lives taken by the sea

Last month, an Italian Navy patrol plane spotted a dinghy vessel with “about 120 persons aboard” sinking into sea. The planed dropped two life-rafts near the sinking vessel, which inflated, and subsequently an Italian Navy Destroyer also launched a helicopter to the scene. A total of three survivors (two from a life-raft and one from the water) were rescued by the helicopter crew. All three survivors, requiring emergency medical treatment, were flown to a hospital and treated for hypothermia.

The three, are the last survivors of “about 120” migrants who were launched from Libyan shores on the smugglers’ dinghy vessel with migrants from Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Gambia and Sudan; all of whom were trying to reach Europe. The survivors reported the vessel began taking on water “after a few hours, it began sinking and people began drowning.” The survivors stated they had started their voyage the day before.

The survivors stated, “many of those on-board wear not wearing life vests,” a life-saving piece of equipment which requires an extra cost when boarding a smuggler’s boat in Libya; which many of the migrants cannot afford. According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), almost 2,300 people died at sea or went missing trying to reach Europe in 2018. The Italian government has banned private rescue boats from bringing migrants to Italian shores, claiming their efforts could facilitate trafficking.

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

API Oil Gas Safety Report 
January 21, 2019

Recently, the American Petroleum Institute (API) released a Workplace Safety Report showing that occupational injuries and illnesses for the oil and gas industry occur at a substantially lower rate than many other industries and are continuing to decline.

“Safety has always been paramount to the natural gas and oil industry. As this report demonstrates, the industry’s leading workplace safety record reflects our commitment to safe and health working environments,” stated Debra Phillips, vice president of API Global Industry Services (GIS). “With strong industry leadership, we continue to enhance our approach to training, prevention and continuous improvement – incorporating advanced technologies, materials and practices as we strive toward our industry-wide goal of zero incidents.”

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

API Oil Gas Safety Report

An Employee’s Life is Worth? 
January 14, 2019

An Employees Life is Worth

Last week, for the first time in thirty (30) years, an Indiana state lawmaker filed legislation to revise Indiana’s workers’ compensation system and penalties for workplace safety violations. Representative Martin Carbaugh (R-Fort Wayne) filed the bill following a local news investigation focusing on the death of Shacarra Hogue, who was crushed inside a press machine at Fort Wayne Plastics on January 7, 2018.

Following the 23-year-old death, state investigators discovered Fort Wayne Plastics had removed safety features from that machinery, so employees could physically climb inside it. Hogue was fatally wounded after a coworker turned on the press as she stood in it. The Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration ultimately fined the company $6,300, and since Shacarra Hogue did not have any dependents, Hogue’s family received only $10,000 in workers’ compensation payouts.

Rep. Carbaugh new legislation would increase maximum penalties for employers cited for certain safety violations, increase from $7,000 to $100,000 the fine imposed on a company for each worker killed in a workplace incident involving company fault, and remove the opportunity for a negotiated reduction in penalties. “Hopefully, a penalty such as this would make employer think twice; ….it doesn’t cost much to risk the life employees,” Rep. Carbaugh stated upon filing the bill. For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

 

Legal Marijuana Use in the Workplace
January 07, 2019

Canadian WorkSafeBC has launched an awareness campaign in an effort to educate employers and workers about possible impairment for the use of legalized recreational marijuana. WorkSafeBC has launched this campaign to advise employers to develop policies that address possible impairment at work and has published literature which outlines managing workplace impairment and policy development.

Tom Borklehurst, director of prevention practices and quality at WorkSafeBC released a press statement, “Impairment in the workplace isn’t a new issue in British Columbia, but it’s become top of mind as cannabis becomes legal for recreational use. We’re reaching out to employers and workers to remind them that they share responsibility for managing impairment in the workplace.”

Canada, like ten states in the United States have legalize recreational cannabis use. However, these states, like Michigan, have already been developing legislation to instruct employers on handling employees who utilize cannabis. For example, Michigan ballot initiative stated, “Employers may not refuse to hire, discharge, discipline, or otherwise take an adverse employment action against a person…because of that person’s violation of a workplace drug policy or because that person was working while under the influence of marijuana.” Also, although legal, the employer is not required to permit recreational marijuana consumption, “in any workplace or on the employer’s property.”

legal marijuana workplace

For further information about this or any other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, news or events, periodically visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.

Standards Clarified for OSHA Issuing Citations
December 18, 2018

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued an interpretation letter to explain the requirements and how they apply the citation process to employers for exposing employees to respiratory hazard from exposure to an air contaminant. However, when a citation isn’t warranted, a “hazard alert letter” may be submitted to an employer.

The OSHA Act requires each employer to “furnish to employees, employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm.” OSHA, when enforcing this requirement, must ensure the following elements have been established to prove a violation of the general duty clause:
1. The employer failed to keep the workplace free of a hazard to which employees of that employer were exposed;
2. The hazard was recognized;
3. The hazard was causing or was likely to cause death or serious physical harm; and,
4. There was a feasible and useful method to correct the hazard.

osha issuing citations

For further information about this or other Environmental Regulatory, Occupational Safety and Health compliance processes, visit our website www.aesmarine.com or contact our offices (210) 430-3469.